Moss Park Infant School

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Computing intent

 

At Moss Park Infant School we shape our computing curriculum to ensure it is fully inclusive to every child. Our aims are to fulfil the requirements of the National Curriculum for computing; providing a broad, balanced and differentiated curriculum; ensuring the progressive development of computing concepts, knowledge and skills; and for the children to develop a love for technology and understand it’s importance in their lives within the  ever changing modern world.

 

At Moss Park Infants pupils are given opportunities to use technology constructively and creatively to solve problems, meet challenges and present their work.  We strive to develop their critical thinking skills so that they may adapt to new technologies as they arise.

The following strands are taught across all year groups with a clear focus on skills progression as children develop from our EYFS setting and into the KS1 National Curriculum:  computer science; creative use of ICT and digital literacy.

 

We use the Corner Stones computing scheme of learning alongside the National Curriculum to support the skills and progression of computer science and computing ensuring clear cross curricular links to other subjects that are taught with EYFS and KS1

 

Implementation

In ensuring high standards of teaching and learning in computing, we implement a curriculum that is progressive throughout the whole school. Computing is taught termly with a skills based progression focusing on age related expectations in the National Curriculum. At Moss Park Infants, we ensure that computing has the same importance given to it as the core subjects, as we feel this is important in enabling all children to gain ‘real-life’ experiences. For example, using iPad or computers to record their mathematical understanding and reasoning. Computing is usually taught weekly or may be blocked together to maximise the time available for enquiry especially for developing young minds to identify switched on learning and unplugged learning.

 

Teachers incorporate opportunities to assess prior learning and frequent pauses to recap on knowledge and vocabulary taught to date.  They plan to revisit topics already taught at a later point in the year – ensuring that children are knowing more, remembering more and understanding more. 

 

We are always developing and updating our resources to ensure that our age pupils have access to technology that not only provides them with rich educational understanding but also allows our children to understand that technology is present in many forms.  We have laptops, iPads, recording devices, programmable toys and interactive touch screens available to support the delivery of high quality computing lessons that can also be suited to cross curricular links.  The laptops have the software required to deliver the computing curriculum through the planned Programmes of Study. All computers are networked and linked to the Internet. The school has an ‘Acceptable use of the Internet’ Policy, which Parents/Guardians are asked to agree to, before their child uses the Internet. 

 

E-safety

Age appropriate online safety education is delivered to all year groups to enable them to understand the importance of being responsible digital users.  This is reviewed regularly due to fast changing online safety issues. 

 

Early Years Provision

Computing is not just about computers. We will ensure that children of Reception age receive a broad, play-based experience of computing through the use of new technologies. 

Early years learning environments should feature IT scenarios based on experience in the real world, such as in role play. Children gain confidence, control and language skills through opportunities such as ‘programming’ each using directional language to find toys/objects, creating artwork using digital tools and controlling programmable toys. 

Outdoor exploration I an important aspect and using digital recording devices such as video recorders, cameras and microphones can support children in developing communication skills. This is particularly beneficial for children who have English as an additional language. 

 

Enrichment

 

At Moss Park Infants, we are developing a Digital Leaders Club (late spring). To become a digital leader, the children from Year 2 have to apply by writing a letter of application explain how they use technology at home and in school and how they see the future of technology as they grow.

 

A Digital Leader is responsible for

  • Finding and testing out new technologies and software that we could use in school, then demonstrating them to other children and teachers.
  • Helping to train the children AND adults in school to use new technologies;
  • Can help other children and adults in school if they have an ICT issue?
  • Being part of a group of pupils who inspire others to talk about keeping safe on line.
  • Helping to develop key areas of computing through pupil voice.

 

Assessment

At the end of each topic, children are assessed against their understanding and knowledge of the statutory requirements of the National Curriculum this is supported through the whole schools assessment programme Target Tracker

 

Implementation

In ensuring high standards of teaching and learning in computing, we implement a curriculum that is progressive throughout the whole school. Computing is taught termly with a skills based progression focusing on age related expectations in the National Curriculum. At Moss Park Infants, we ensure that computing has the same importance given to it as the core subjects, as we feel this is important in enabling all children to gain ‘real-life’ experiences. For example, using iPad or computers to record their mathematical understanding and reasoning.

 

Impact

The impact and measure of this is to ensure that children at Moss Park Infants are equipped with computing skills and knowledge that will enable them to be ready for the curriculum at Key Stage 2 and for life as an adult in the wider world.  We want the children to have thoroughly enjoyed learning about computing but to also know how important it is to keep yourself safe when using online technologies, software and the importance of staying safe online.

 

How can I help my child at home?

 

EYFS:

 

Soungle

Using pre-recorded sounds of the natural world and the world of technology to listen and discuss what you can here. Understanding the world and how technology is an ever changing part of this is important in early child hood development, recognising core skills of speaking, listening and attention.

Webcams

Knowing that technology is used in the everyday world is important. As a forest school children learn that monitoring and conservation is integral in sustaining an eco-friendly world. Technology and recognising the links between how we use this in everyday living demonstrates to young minds that it can have clear benefits and impact.

 

Key Stage 1:

 

Bee-bot
We have a set of Bee-bots in Foundation Stage, so by the time the children get to year one they are familiar with these great little robots. There is an app which mirrors the physical robots and is a good introduction into how computers need algorithms (instructions) to function. 

 

ScratchJr
ScratchJr is a fantastic entry point for children to explore more open ended programming. It introduces characters, background, more movements, repeat loops and basic if/then routines and offers children the opportunity to experiment and play. There are lots of great ideas for projects on the ScratchJr website. 

sensor. It also has all the wires and connectors you need for basic projects. Once you get familiar with it, you can combine elements, so you could make the light illuminate when the ultrasonic sensor is triggered. This is also programmed through a simple Scratch type interface.

 

School Awards

 
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